Thousand Island Lakes

Why? This picturesque lake, set in the Sierra National Forest near Mammoth, CA, is named after its appearance: dotted with numerous rocky islands within the lake itself. The lake itself is formed from the bottom of a valley from glacial erosion.

IMG_9903(My pup, Baloo, at Thousand Island Lake with Banner Peak in the background)

There are several ways to reach this beauty, via

  • Pacific Crest Trail (PCT)
  • John Muir Trail (JMT)
  • Sierra High Route
  • High Trail (aka Agnew Meadows).

We chose the latter, via Agnew Meadows, because it was the “easier” of the 4 choices. The trail from Agnews Meadows is only 14.3 miles out & back and is rated on Alltrails as “difficult” and is the northbound section of the PCT. The trail itself does get steep in some sections but reports from the half of my group (that started from Sierra High Route) says that High Trail is significantly easier and shorter than the Sierra High Route. And of course the number one reason is that High Trail has sweeping views and I am ALL ABOUT THE VIEWS. The trailhead at Agnew Meadows starts at 8,340 ft elevation and ends at Thousand Island Lake at 9,840 ft elevation.

Another tidbit of info: I try to only backpack trails that are dog friendly, as you can see above in the photo. Also, when staying overnight/backpacking, you must obtain permits. Because we came in from Mammoth and started our route at Agnew Meadows/High Trail, we grabbed ours from Mammoth Ranger Station  since it was on the way. Click on hyperlinks for more info.

IMG_9896

As someone who loves to backpack but has a DEEP HATRED and fear of mosquitoes (hypersensitivity to mosquito bites & have severe allergic reactions to bug bites while overseas), I like to backpack in early spring or early fall. Due to my work schedule, for this trip, my availability was early October. As you can see from the photos, there was a bit of snow on the ground when we went.

As you begin the trail and wind upwards, you’ll reach a sign in a brush area stating that you are in Ansel Adams Wilderness.

IMG_1349 copy

At this point, although the uphill makes it seem further, you’ve only covered 0.4 miles of the trail. You’ll reach a series of switchbacks after this point and once you reach the top of those switchbacks, you’ll start to get some great views. And the views only get better from there.

IMG_9918(some of the views on the trail)

As you  start to see Shadow Lake from Agnew Meadows, you’ll know you’ve reached the 3 mile marker. You’ll end up reaching sweeping canyon views and, if it’s the same time of year that I went, fields of butterflies and deer crossings.

shadow lake2(Shadow Lake)

After this point, you’ll come across several streams, so if you’re a thirsty hiker, fret not, there are plenty of places to replenish your camelback with your water pump. Enjoy these views while you can, once you pass some volcanic rock croppings, loosely resembling that of the Devil’s Postpile, you’ll drop into some trees. You’ll also run into some junctions between mile 5-7.5, but keep to the left and be studious to follow signs for Thousand Island. When you reach the River Trail junction at mile 7.75, continue right and there will only be another mile before you reach Thousand Island Lake. Once you hit the merger for the JMT and PCT junction, you’ve reached the end of High Trail and have reached the outlet of the lake.

You are not allowed to camp near the outlet and if you continue hiking along the lake, you’ll see a white sign with an illustration of the lake. The illustration will show you at what point you are able to set-up camp. I highly recommend hiking further in, alongside the lake, there are lots of sweet camping spots so don’t let your tired feet dictate where your shitty camp will be set-up lol!

IMG_9910My group was tired, so we set up camp on some rocky outcroppings. While it was a decent view, the terrain was crap. When I took a hike further along, there were some nice grassy areas with great views that we could have camped on.

IMG_9857While this photo looks nice and sunny, let me tell ya: it hit 19 degrees F the first night. Also, every morning was so cold that the frost froze the grass blades and ice froze clung to the edges of the lake. Sooooo if you happen to go around this time as well: dress warm and bring layers. However, the plus side was that there was NO ONE in sight. We had this lake all to ourselves. Damnit I love my solitude so much. I read that this spot can be a pretty busy backpackers destination so camping spots may become scarce.

 

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